MEDIAN HOME PRICES DECLINES $20K IN JUNE TO $950K

Posted by Rick Griffin on Jul 20, 2022 2:00:00 PM

MARCH MEDIAN HOME PRICE HITS $950K, A 1-YEAR JUMP OF $150K

California’s housing market in June 2022 continued to downshift as housing demand logged its biggest dip since May 2020, cooling to levels not seen in the past two years.

The latest home sales and price report from the California Association of REALTORS® (C.A.R.) also showed San Diego County’s home sales dropping 30.5 percent in June 2022, compared to June 2021, and a 6.4 percent decline from May 2022.

Closed escrow sales of existing, single-family detached homes in California totaled a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 344,970 in June 2022, according to information collected by C.A.R. from more than 90 local REALTOR® associations and MLSs statewide. The statewide annualized sales figure represents what would be the total number of homes sold during 2022 if sales maintained the June pace throughout the year. It is adjusted to account for seasonal factors that typically influence home sales.

The sales pace in June 2022 was down 8.4 percent on a monthly comparison with May 2022 when 376,560 homes were sold and down 20.9 percent from a year ago in June 2021, when 436,020 homes were sold on an annualized basis. Home sales again dipped below the 400,000 level for the second time since June 2020.

Year-to-date statewide home sales were down 10.9 percent in June 2022.

Meanwhile, California’s median home price in June 2022 declined 4.0 percent to $863,790 from the revised record-high of $900,170 recorded in May 2022. The June 2022 price was 5.4 percent higher than the $819,630 recorded in June 2021.

In San Diego, the median price of a single-family home in June 2022 declined by $20,000, or 2.1 percent, to $950,000, compared to $970,000 in May 2022. The June 2022 median price was still 9.8 percent higher from the year-ago price of $865,000 in June 2021. The median is the price at which half of the homes sell for more and half for less.

The moderation in the median home price was due partly to a change in the mix of sales in June, as the high-end market started pulling back.

After increasing for four consecutive months, the share of million-dollar home sales dipped as sales in the higher-price segment dropped 8.3 percent from the prior month. Sales of homes priced at $2 million and higher plummeted 17.9 percent from May 2022. On the other hand, the sub-$500,000 market increased 2.1 percent on a month-to-month basis in June 2022.

Price moderation is expected to continue in July as sharp declines in pending sales in the upper-price segments may drag the statewide median price in the upcoming months.

“California’s housing market continues to moderate from the frenzied levels seen in the past two years, which is creating favorable conditions for buyers who lost offers or sat out during the fiercely competitive market,” said C.A.R. President Otto Catrina, a Bay Area real estate broker and REALTOR®. “With interest rates moving sideways in recent weeks and fewer homes now selling above listing price, prospective buyers have the rare opportunity to see more listings coming onto the market and face less competition that could force them to engage in a bidding war.” 

“Excluding the three-month pandemic lockdown period in 2020, June’s sales level was the lowest since April 2008. Pending sales data also suggests we can expect additional retreating in the coming months,” said C.A.R. Vice President and Chief Economist Jordan Levine. “With inflation remaining high and interest rates expected to climb further in the coming months, the market will normalize further in the second half of the year with softer sales and more moderate price growth.”

Other key points from C.A.R.’s June 2022 resale housing report included:

-- At the regional level, all major regions experienced double-digit declines in June 2022, compared to June 2021, with three of the five regions falling by more than 25 percent on a year-over-year basis. Southern California had the biggest drop of all regions, with sales plunging 27.1 percent from a year ago.

-- At the regional level, home prices in all major California regions increased in price from last year with the Central Coast leading the way at 10.1 percent increase, followed by Central Valley (10.0 percent) and Southern California (8.4 percent).

-- The overall supply conditions in California improved again in June 2022, with the statewide unsold inventory index rising to 2.5 months, the highest level in two years. The improvement in the index was partly due to an increase in supply and partly due to a pullback in demand. The June 2022 inventory level compared to 2.1 months in May 2022, 1.8 months in April 2022, 1.7 months in March 2022 and 1.7 months in June 2021.

-- In San Diego, the inventory of available homes for sale in June 2022 was 2.4 months, compared to 1.9 months in May 2022, 1.6 months in April 2022, 1.4 months in March 2022 and 1.5 months in June 2022. Inventory levels indicate the number of months it would take for the available supply of homes on the market to sell-out given the current rate of sales.

June 2022 County Sales and Price Activity
(Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)

June 2022 County Sales and Price Activity

-- With both closed sales and pending sales slowing by more than 20 percent, total active listings surged 64.4 percent in June 2022, the largest year-over-year growth in more than seven years. Active listings in June 2022 also climbed to the highest level since November 2019, with a month-to-month increase of 28.8 percent from May.

-- The median number of days it took to sell a California single-family home was 11 days in June 2022, compared to 9 days in May 2022 and 8 days in June 2022.

-- In San Diego, the median number of days it took to sell an existing, single-family home in June 2022 was 8 days, compared to 7 days in May 2022 and April 2022. A year ago, in June 2021, the figure was 6 days. The median represents a time when half the homes sell above it and half below it.

June 2022 County Unsold Inventory and Days on Market
(Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)

June 2022 County Unsold Inventory and Days on Market

-- The statewide median sales-price-to-list-price ratio remained above 100 percent at 101.3 percent in Jun 2022, compared to 103.4 percent in May 2022, 104.2 percent in April 2022, 103.3 percent in March 2022 and 104.1 percent in June 2021. Sales-to-list-price ratio is an indicator that reflects the negotiation power of home buyers and sellers under current market conditions. The ratio, expressed as a percentage, is calculated by dividing the final sales price of a property by its last list price. A sales-to-list ratio with 100 percent or above suggests that the property sold for more than the list price, while a ratio below 100 percent indicates that the price sold below the asking price.

-- The 30-year, fixed-mortgage interest rate averaged 5.52 percent in June, up from 2.98 percent in June 2021, according to Freddie Mac. The five-year, adjustable mortgage interest rate averaged 4.28 percent, compared to 2.56 percent in June 2021.

Topics: Brokers/Managers, Market Information

Registered vs. Coming Soon

Posted by PSAR Communication on Jul 14, 2022 12:35:04 PM

 

Registered vs Coming Soon

Click here to view the Registered FAQ and Click here to view the Coming Soon FAQ.

For an updated printable PDF of this checklist, go here.
Download the coming soon form to be signed by sellers here.

coming soon vs registered

 

1 Registered listing contracts do not enter the MLS per the seller’s instructions, either temporarily or for the whole term
of the listing. They are not “in” the MLS. Only the listing agent, listing broker, and office manager, and Association/CRMLS staff can view Registered listings.

2 Agents may treat a Coming Soon listing like an Active listing that no one can show for 21 days and that does not go out via listing distribution feeds (Realtor.com, etc.). Click here to learn more about IDX and listing distribution.

3 If agents are using the C.A.R. form RLA dated 6/2020 and option 7.D.1 is complete, agents do not need an additional
exclusion form. Agents do not need to submit exclusion forms to CRMLS. However, they do need to keep the signed and completed form(s) on file with the brokerage and provide them if the CRMLS Compliance Department requests them.

4 Agents may only show Registered listings to clients of the listing brokerage firm. CRMLS defines a “client” as an individual or entity that has signed, within the previous year, a Disclosure Regarding Real Estate Agency Relationship form in Compliance with CA Civil Code section 2079.16 which identifies the Listing Broker.

5 Coming Soon listings in San Diego County will go out to IDX feeds for applicable brokers. Applicable brokers are those
who participate in CRMLS and have Coming Soon listings for properties in San Diego County, regardless of their MLS
system or Association or Board membership. This does not affect any CRMLS listings outside of San Diego County.

6Agents may only use the Coming Soon status for a maximum of 21 days from the date of entry. On day 22, the MLS system will move the listing into Active status. Please note: Agents may list New Construction Listings under the status of Coming Soon for longer than 21 days (until a notice of occupancy is issued), per Rule 7.18.4 of the CRMLS Rules and Regulations.

7. Information provided by CRMLS and current as of 7-14-2022.  Rules constantly change. Check the CRMLS knowledge base for updated rules and changes.  

Topics: Brokers/Managers, CRMLS, Paragon

PSAR Announces Its 2023/24 Board of Directors and Officers

Posted by PSAR Communication on Jun 28, 2022 11:44:43 AM

PSAR 2023 Elections

The Pacific Southwest Association of REALTORS® finalized its 2023 leadership team on June 24th. The following leaders were elected as Officers and Directors to serve in 2023.

President-Elect
Laurie MacDonald

Laurie MacDonald

 

Secretary / Treasurer
Sam Calvano

Sam Calvano

 

Directors

Merrie Espina
Merrie Espina
Valerie Gardner
Valarie Gardner
Rafael Perez
Rafael Perez
Amy Ruiz
Amy Ruiz
Amber Tannehill
Amber Tannehill
 

Affiliate Director

Martha Garcia
Martha Garcia

The incumbent set of Board of Directors and Officers will remain in their posts and continue to serve PSAR until December 31st, 2022.

Board of Directors (2023)

Jason Lopez, 2023 President

Laurie MacDonald, 2023 President-Elect

Sam Calvano, 2023 Secretary-Treasurer

Max Zaker, Immediate Past President

Anthony Andaya, 2022/2023 Director

Camille Bruno, 2022/2023 Director

Merrie Espina, 2023/2024 Director

Valerie Gardner, 2023/2024 Director

Paula Gonzalez, 2022/2023 Director

Dylan Graham, 2022/2023 Director

Rafael Perez, 2023/2024 Director

Amy Ruiz, 2023/2024 Director

Norma Scantlin, 2022/2023 Director

Amber Tannehill, 2023/2024 Director

Martha Garcia, 2023/2024 Affiliate Director

________________________________________________

PSAR's Mission is to empower Real Estate Professionals.

Since 1928, the Pacific Southwest Association of REALTORS® has played a significant role in shaping the history, growth, and development of the Real Estate industry in San Diego County.

We remain thankful to those who were nominated to lead PSAR. We are looking forward to great things from both the elected candidates and those who will continue to serve in our committee leadership roster.

Topics: Leadership

PRICES SET ANOTHER RECORD AS RATES CONTINUE RISING

Posted by Rick Griffin on Jun 17, 2022 10:00:00 AM

MARCH MEDIAN HOME PRICE HITS $950K, A 1-YEAR JUMP OF $150K

California’s housing market in May 2022 started showing signs of shifting to a more balanced market due to mortgage rates surpassing 5 percent for the first time since April 2010, leading to the lowest sales level since June 2020 and the largest year-over-year decline in five months.

The latest home sales and price report from the California Association of REALTORS® (C.A.R.) also showed San Diego County’s home sales dropping 13.9 percent in May 2022, compared to May 2021, and a 4.6 percent decline from April 2022.

Closed escrow sales of existing, single-family detached homes in California totaled a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 377,790 in May, according to information collected by C.A.R. from 90 local REALTOR® associations and MLSs statewide. The statewide annualized sales figure represents what would be the total number of homes sold during 2022 if sales maintained the May pace throughout the year. It is adjusted to account for seasonal factors that typically influence home sales.

Statewide, May 2022’s sales pace was down 9.8 percent on a monthly basis compared to 419,040 in April 2022 and down 15.2 percent from May 2021, when 445,660 homes were sold on an annualized basis. Home sales dipped below the 400,000 level for the first time since June 2020.

While public health concerns and market uncertainty were the triggering factors that resulted in the sales decline two years ago, tight supply and the higher cost of borrowing is believed to be responsible for the near double-digit decline this time around. 

The statewide median home price in May 2022 set another record at $898,980, surpassing the record set in April 2022 of $884,890. The May 2022 price was 1.6 percent higher than the April 2022 median price and 9.9 percent higher than the $818,260 recorded last May 2021.

The higher prices can largely be attributed to the mix of sales with the high-end market, which continues to outperform the more affordable market segments. The share of million-dollar home sales in May 2022 increased for the fourth straight month and reached the highest level on record at 35.3 percent, while home sales priced below $500,000 dipped again in May 2022 and hit the lowest level of all time.

Home prices could be leveling off as the monthly gain in price appears to be moderating. The month-over-month increase of 1.6 percent for the May 2022 median home price was still higher but only slightly above the long run average of 1.1 percent recorded between April 2022 and May 2022 in the last 43 years.

The median price of a single-family home in San Diego declined a mere $5,000, or 0.5 percent, to $970,000 in May 2022 from $975,000 in April 2022. The May 2022 median price was still 14.0 percent higher from the year-ago price of $851,000 in May 2021, marking an increase of nearly $150,000 in one year. The median represents a price where half of the homes sell above and half below.

“We’re beginning to see signs of a more balanced housing market with fewer homes selling above list price and homes remaining on the market a little longer than in previous months,” said C.A.R. President Otto Catrina, a Bay Area real estate broker, and REALTOR®. “What this tells us is that there is slightly more supply, fewer- and less-intense bidding wars, and those who've experienced ‘buyers' fatigue’ may now have a window of opportunity.” 

“Pending home sales declined 30.6 percent in May, the biggest drop since the first month of the pandemic, likely due to eroding affordability, rising mortgage rates and home prices, and the increased risk of a recession,” said C.A.R. Vice President and Chief Economist Jordan Levine. “The combined effect of the aforementioned factors resulted in a record increase in the average monthly mortgage payment to a typical home by more than 40 percent in May. With the Fed expected to raise rates further in the second half of the year, the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage could surge past 6 percent by year's end and lead to more affordability challenges for potential homebuyers.”

Other key points from C.A.R.’s May 2022 resale housing report included:

-- At the regional level, all major regions declined in sales from last year, with four of the five regions falling by double-digits on a year-over-year basis. Compared to the pre-pandemic average calculated using sales from May 2017, May 2018, and May 2019, the Southern California region’s sales were also down 19.8 percent in May 2022.

-- At the regional level, home prices in all major California regions increased in price from last year by more than 10 percent, with the Far North and Southern California setting new record medians in May. The Far North also had the highest year-over-year growth in price with a surge of 16.4 percent, followed by the Central Valley (12.4 percent), the San Francisco Bay Area (12.3 percent), Southern California (11.9 percent), and the Central Coast (10.6 percent).

-- California’s unsold inventory of homes improved in May 2022 to 2.1 months, compared to 1.8 months in April 2022, 1.7 months in March 2022, and 1.8 months in May 2021.

-- With both closed sales and pending sales slowing by double-digits, total active listings experienced a gain of 46.7 percent in May 2022, the largest year-over-year growth in at least the last 89 months. Active listings in May 2022 also climbed to the highest level since July 2020 and had a month-to-month increase of 26.4 percent from April 2022.

May 2022 County Sales and Price Activity
(Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)
May 2022 County Sales and Price Activity

-- In San Diego, the inventory of available homes for sale in May 2022 was 1.9 months, compared to 1.6 months in April 2022, 1.4 months in March 2022 and 1.6 months in May 2021. Inventory levels indicate the number of months it would take for the available supply of homes on the market to sell out given the current rate of sales.

-- The median number of days it took to sell a California single-family home was 9 days in May 2022 and 7 days in May 2021.

May 2022 County Unsold Inventory and Days on Market
(Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)May 2022 County Unsold Inventory and Days on Market

-- In San Diego, the median number of days it took to sell an existing, single-family home in May 2022 was 7 days, which was the same number in April 2022 and May 2021. The median represents a time when half the homes sell above it and half below it.

-- The statewide median sales-price-to-list-price ratio remained above 100 percent at 103.4 percent in May 2022, compared to 104.2 percent in April 2022, 103.3 percent in March 2022, and 103.8 percent in May 2021.

Sales-to-list-price ratio is an indicator that reflects the negotiation power of home buyers and sellers under current market conditions. The ratio, expressed as a percentage, is calculated by dividing the final sales price of a property by its last list price. A sales-to-list ratio of 100 percent or above suggests that the property sold for more than the list price, while a ratio below 100 percent indicates that the price sold below the asking price.

-- The 30-year, fixed-mortgage interest rate averaged 5.23 percent in May, up from 2.96 percent in May 2021, according to Freddie Mac. The five-year, adjustable mortgage interest rate averaged 4.06 percent, compared to 2.62 percent in May 2021.

Topics: Brokers/Managers, Market Information

Nominees for PSAR's 2023 Board of Directors

Posted by PSAR Communication on May 24, 2022 4:41:41 PM

PSAR 2023 Elections

The Pacific Southwest Association of REALTORS® Nominating Committee and the Board of Directors respectfully submit the following nominees for the 2023 Officers and Directors Annual Election.

President-Elect
Laurie MacDonald

Laurie MacDonald


Secretary / Treasurer

Sam Calvano

Sam Calvano

 

Directors (5 Two-Year Seats)

Merrie Espina
Merrie Espina
Valerie Gardner
Valarie Gardner
Rafael Perez
Rafael Perez
Amy Ruiz
Amy Ruiz
Amber Tannehill
Amber Tannehill
 

Affiliate Director (1 Seat)

Martha Garcia                                         Zoë Khetani
Martha Garcia                   Zoë Khetani


If you are a qualified member interested in filing a petition to campaign as a candidate, please complete and submit the Board of Directors Petition Form to the Association no later than Friday, May 27th, 2022

Board of Directors Petition Form

Note, Petitioned Candidates will interview with the Nominating Committee between Monday, May 30th and Thursday, June 2nd, 2022

The full list of candidates will be announced Friday, June 3rd, 2022.
Online Elections will begin Friday, June 17th, and continue through Friday, June 24th, 2022

Topics: Leadership

Housing Discrimination - What Owners need to know

Posted by Monica Lopez on May 22, 2022 10:00:00 AM

Fair Housing Resources

CSA San Diego County, Written by Monica Lopez

CSA San Diego County investigates hundreds of fair housing complaints annually. Not all complaints have intentional actions at their source. A certain number are the result of agents or landlords lacking proper training, in-depth knowledge of fair housing laws, or the use of rental documents that are out of date.

Fair Housing Training
Fair housing training is a critical element in reducing complaints. Housing providers should ensure that they and their employees understand their responsibilities under federal and state fair housing laws, and act on those responsibilities in their daily interactions with both applicants and residents.

An example of the need to stay current on fair housing laws training: 
Amy the apartment manager received training in fair housing laws in 2008 when she was first hired. Recently, she denied an applicant because their housing community, to her knowledge, does not accept Section 8 vouchers. Had Amy updated her training annually, she would have been made aware that the applicants receiving assistance from programs such as Section 8 are now protected under Source of Income laws.

Fair Housing Knowledge
In-depth knowledge of fair housing laws is essential as well. Limited fair housing education can result in wrongful actions and costly lawsuits.

An example of the need for in-depth knowledge of fair housing laws:
Sara the leasing agent was recently hired and was required to watch a 1-hour fair housing training video during orientation. The video covered very basic information regarding protected groups and prohibited actions, but do specifics on disability-related topics. Six months later, Sara encountered a complaint. She had informed an applicant with a disability that they could not rent a unit in her building because his assistance animal was on the "breed restricted" list. Sara was unaware of "reasonable accommodations" under California law.

Discriminatory Policies, Practices, and Procedures
CSA has experience in investigating errors that occur in rental applications, rental agreements, and house rules. A well-educated and currently trained individual should always review any of these documents before implementing them to ensure the contents comply with fair housing laws.

An example of the need for awareness of discriminatory practices:
A house rule that prohibits children from leaving their apartment unless accompanied by a parent. The Fair Housing Act prohibits rules that target any protected groups. Families with children may encounter issues with housing providers who maintain overly restrictive or targeted rules. Having a fair housing law-educated and trained individual review your rules prior to posting is always the best practice.

The solution to housing discrimination starts with you.  If you or your staff are in need of training, contact CSA.

CSA San Diego County
327 Van Houten Avenue, El Cajon, CA 92020
www.c4sa.org
Phone: 619-444-5700
TTY: 800-735-2929

CSA San Diego County is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose primary mission is the promotion of social justice and public welfare through programs, services, and advocacy against all forms of discrimination, including advocacy for the eradication of housing discrimination to assure equal housing opportunity for all individuals.

_______________________________________

Any opinion, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of HUD. This material is based on work supported by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) under FHIP Grant FEOI210047.

Topics: Education, Brokers/Managers, Industry

PSAR Members Made Their Voices Heard

Posted by Communications on May 20, 2022 3:36:05 PM

PXL_20220518_032748639.MPb

Members of the Pacific Southwest Association of REALTORS® (PSAR) made a powerful statement for property rights on behalf of housing providers while attending a recent Chula Vista City Council meeting where the subject of a new rent control ordinance was on the docket.

The City Council was considering an aggressive and overreaching ordinance that imposes additional regulations on housing providers. The controversial proposal, if passed, would negatively impact new housing creation by tightening restrictions on remodeling, owner move-ins and rental unit withdrawals, as well as expanding noticing and relocation assistance requirements.

Following over five hours of public comments, including testimony from many PSAR members, the City Council tabled a vote on the proposed ordinance, titled the “Residential Landlord and Tenant Provisions.” The Council stated that more data on the topic and potential language revisions are needed.

The actions taken by PSAR members were considered invaluable in the successful effort to prevent the Council from implementing an ordinance that would exacerbate the housing crisis. A revised version of the ordinance is expected to be considered by the City Council at a July 12 session.

Among the PSAR members who spoke at the May 17 city council meeting: Pat Russiano, Mike Campbell, Mark Scott, Nikki Coppa, Rich D'Ascoli, Yvonne Cromer, Robert Cromer, Mitch Thompson, George Ching, Eric Sutton, Peter Carlseen, Sam Calvano, Lupe Soto, Earl Jentz, Myllissa McCann and Josh Morales.

Richard D’Ascoli, PSAR CEO, stated in his testimony, “Most housing providers and owners are good people and most renters are good people. This extreme ordinance will punish every homeowner who may want to rent out a home and every renter who can’t find a place to rent.”

D’Ascoli cited a city staff report that included information from the Legal Aid Society of San Diego. According to the data, “no-fault” eviction disputes involve fewer than .27 percent of the 33,000 rental homes in Chula Vista annually, pointing to a much smaller issue.

The number of evictions totaled 13 in March, three in February, and seven in January. “Shouldn’t we help those 13 households rather than impact 33,000 rental units?” D’Ascoli asked. “Most housing providers are good actors, it’s the few we need to address. Let’s focus on them and not punish the entire city.”

D’Ascoli identified the long-term ramifications of the proposed ordinance: “Rent control and similar market restrictions will discourage the creation, maintenance, and upgrade of rental housing stock. This ordinance will discourage additional rehab and negatively impact the low-income renters the provisions were intended to serve. This ordinance also will reduce the value of properties in Chula Vista, compared to similar properties in other cities. Prudent property owners will choose to buy or build in areas with less cost and regulatory risk.

“Chula Vista will stagnate as the incentive to replacing aging, smaller complexes with upgraded, more dense buildings will no longer exist. Owners of single-family rental homes will either sell to national real estate investment trusts or they will sell to new owner-occupants. Available rental stock will decrease. Prices for renters will increase because supply will continue to be highly restricted. Also worrisome is the provision that anyone who violates any part of this law could be charged with a crime and sent to jail for up to six months.”

Other speakers from PSAR made the following points:

-- Burdensome regulations will result in less available housing, not more. This ordinance adds to the regulatory burden.
-- Provisions in the ordinance meant to prevent harassment of tenants would deter property owners from dealing with nuisance tenants.
-- Added renovation regulations would deter owners from upgrading rental properties, thus hurting tenants and surrounding neighborhoods.
-- The ordinance would create new, vague “anti-harassment” rules regulating landlord-tenant interaction, expanded notification requirements of up to 365 days, and higher relocation payments.
-- Landlords would be required to offer evicted renters, even if those renters caused property damage, the first right of refusal to move back in after a renovation.
-- The state of California recently enacted protections for tenants with AB 1482. That law provides sufficient regulation of landlord-tenant relationships.

Coalition partners with PSAR on the proposed Chula Vista ordinance included the Southern California Rental Housing Association (SCRHA) and the San Diego Association of REALTORS® (SDAR).

More Articles and News Coverage

Renters, Landlords at Odds Over Proposed No-Fault Eviction Proposal - Mitch Thompson shows new appliances as part of remodeling efforts. KPBS-TV, 05/17/2022.

Chula Vista City Council Postpones Eviction Moratorium Protection Vote - No decision after more than five hours of public comments and postponement until July 12. KPBS-TV, 05/18/2022.

Chula Vista City Council Considers Controversial Tenant Protection Ordinance - PSAR board member Jason Lopez explains the proposal is a solution looking for a problem. KUSI-TV, 05/18/2022.

Chula Vista Considers Ordinance Strengthening Protections for Tenants - PSAR 2022 President Max Zaker and PSAR member Mitch Thompson tell NBC 7 how the proposal would actually hurt tenants. KNSD-TV NBC 7 San Diego, 05/16/2022.

Chula Vista Council Hears from Over 50 Speakers - The meeting lasted for hours as landlords say the proposed ordinance would force them to sell their propertiesKGTV-TV 10News, 05/17/2022.

Decision Postponed on Controversial Renters' Protections - Quote from PSAR CEO Rich D'Ascoli: "...An ordinance that is overreaching..." KFMB-TV, CBS8, 05/18/2022.

 

Topics: Brokers/Managers, Government Affairs, Market Information, Industry

Please Vote on (or before) June 7th

Posted by PSAR Government Affairs on May 19, 2022 3:30:00 PM

Please remember to vote on (or before) June 7th.  All California active registered voters received a vote-by-mail ballot.  For more information on your voting options, Click Here.  

Candidate Guide

PSAR is a non-partisan organization.  PSAR Members, and the clients they serve, run the gamut of the political spectrum.  However, they are united in their mission to protect private property rights and promote homeownership.  That mission is core to PSAR's Government Affairs Committee.    

The Government Affairs Committee received requests to provide recommendations on the candidates running in the races listed below.  After vetting the positions of the candidates on issues that impact private property rights and homeownership, the committee determined that, among likely candidates, the following candidates are most inclined to promote private property rights and homeownership if elected to the offices they seek:

 
 

County Assessor/Recorder/Clerk,(For General Election in November) 

Jordan Marks-1
   Jordan Marks 

80th Assembly District:

David Alvarez

David Alvarez
38th Senate District:

Brian Jones-1

Brian Jones

Chula Vista Mayor:

John McCann-1

 John McCann 

Chula Vista Mayor:

Jill Galvez
Jill Galvez 

Chula Vista Mayor:

Rudy Ramirez

Rudy Ramirez


Chula Vista City Attorney:

John Moot

John Moot


Chula Vista City Council District 1:

Robert Cromer

Robert Cromer

 

Once again, please remember to vote!

Topics: Announcements, Government Affairs

CRMLS Connect App will retire on May 31st - Act Now

Posted by PSAR Communication on May 18, 2022 1:00:00 PM

CRMLS Connect will no longer be available. CRMLS offers access to several product solutions that duplicate its primary features, which include MLS search in a universal (agent/client) interface, client collaboration features, and client activity tracking. Only 2% of CRMLS users currently use this app.crmls connect

On 5/31, CRMLS Connect will retire completely and anything users don't back up outside of the product will be gone.  CRMLS Connect does not have an export option. Anyone who wants to save anything about their CRMLS Connect accounts must retrieve their data before 5/31. So ACT NOW to move your clients to one of the other free CRMLS core products.

The products below are available at no extra cost and replicate some or all of the features on offer in CRMLS Connect, plus additional benefits but you will need to enter your current clients. 

Cloud Streams (Best Option For Most)
Is a listing alert and client collaboration tool that lets you share listings with your clients and get instant feedback. Build your relationship with your clients as they like, dislike, and share the agent-branded listing alerts you tailor to their preferences. This product can also text listings to clients and works great with data share partner listings.

Creating your first Stream
First Cloud Stream

Client Onboarding
Onboarding Cloud Streams Clients

Creating Custom Map Area
Creating custom Stream Map Area
Setting up text Alerts
Setting Up Text Alerts

More information on Cloud Streams

 

Cloud MLX
Search the way you think. With autocompleted results, a wide variety of parameters, and easy search saving, you can access your CRMLS data at the drop of a hat. Share listing data through the launcher, use the built-in agent chat feature, and find other agents through the search bar. Cloud MLX works the same way on any modern device – desktop, tablet, or mobile.

More Cloud MLX  Videos                  More Information on Cloud MLX

 

MLS - Touch
MLS-Touch allows you to quickly access all your MLS listings directly on your phone or tablet. As long as you have mobile internet service, you have the power of the MLS in your hand. Search by map or by additional advanced MLS filters. Generate hot sheets, sales comparisons, or market statistics instantly, then share with your clients, find other agents, and manage your contacts

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Topics: Education

No Surprise: Rising Interest Rates, Climbing Home Prices

Posted by Rick Griffin on May 18, 2022 10:30:00 AM

MARCH MEDIAN HOME PRICE HITS $950K, A 1-YEAR JUMP OF $150K

California home sales retreated slightly in April 2022 even as interest rates rose and the statewide median home price set another record, according to the latest home sales and price report from the California Association of REALTORS® (C.A.R.).

The statewide median home price in April 2022 was $884,890, up 4.2 percent from the March 2022 price of $849,080 and up 8.7 percent from the April 2021 price of $814,010. The April 2022 statewide median home price set another record, surpassing the previous record set in March 2022.

The year-over-year increase was the smallest since June 2020, but it was strong enough to establish a new peak price for the state. The month-to-month percent change was higher than the long-run average of 2.3 percent recorded between the months of March and April over the last 43 years. 

In San Diego in April 2022, the median home price approached the $1 million mark. The April 2022 median home price was $975,000, a 2.6 percent increase from the $950,000 price in March 2022 and 8.2 percent higher from the year-ago price of $825,120 in April 2021, marking an increase of about $150,000 in one year. The median represents a price where half the homes sell above and half below.

April 2022 County Sales and Price Activity
(Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)

April 2022 County Sales and Price Activity

Home sales in April 2022 on a statewide basis were down 1.9 percent compared to March 2022, when 426,970 homes were sold, and down 8.5 percent from a year ago in April 2021, when 458,170 homes were sold on an annual basis.

Closed escrow sales of existing, single-family detached homes in California totaled a seasonally-adjusted annualized rate of 419,040 in April 2022, according to information collected by C.A.R. from more than 90 local REALTOR® associations and MLSs statewide. The statewide annualized sales figure represents what would be the total number of homes sold during 2022 if sales maintained the April pace throughout the year. It is adjusted to account for seasonal factors that typically influence home sales.

The month-to-month April sales decline is in line with the long-run change of minus 1.6 percent recorded between March and April. However, the annual statewide sales drop between April 2022 and April 2021 was the biggest decline in the past four months. On a year-to-date basis, home sales were down 7.4 percent in April 2022.

In San Diego, home sales in April 2022 were lower in month-over-month and year-over-year comparisons. San Diego home sales in April 2022 were down 1.3 percent, compared to March 2022, and down 12.6 percent compared to a year ago in April 2021.

“As rates remain on the rise, the sense of urgency to buy is keeping the market highly competitive, especially since housing inventory continues to stay well below pre-pandemic levels,” said C.A.R. President Otto Catrina, a Bay Area real estate broker and REALTOR®. “While we will likely see more listings come on to the market as we move further into the home-buying season, the housing shortage issue will likely persist throughout the rest of the year in major metropolitan areas, such as the Bay Area and the Southern California region.” 

“California’s housing market is moderating from the 12-year-high levels experienced in 2021, as higher mortgage interest rates and soaring home prices are starting to have an adverse impact on housing demand,” said C.A.R. Vice President and Chief Economist Jordan Levine. “With April pending home sales recording the worst drop in two years, the affordability challenges that buyers have been encountering are materializing in recent sales trends, and further declines in housing demand could continue in the second half of the year.”

A change in the mix of sales continues to play a role in statewide record-setting home prices as sales in high-priced markets remain stronger than their more affordable counterparts. The share of million-dollar home sales increased for the third consecutive month, reaching the highest level on record at 34.7 percent.

Meanwhile, home sales priced below $500,000 dipped again in April and hit the lowest level ever. Sales dropped by double-digits for price segments $750,000 and below, while sales above $2 million remained on the rise on a year-over-year basis. The shift in the mix of sales toward high-end homes is expected to persist in the upcoming months. 

Other key points from C.A.R.’s April 2022 resale housing report included:

-- At the regional level, home sales in all major California regions declined from a year ago, with three of the five regions falling by double-digits on a year-over-year basis. The San Francisco Bay Area (-18.1 percent) and Southern California (-16.0 percent) were two major regions with sales declines exceeding 10 percent from a year ago.

-- Home prices in all major regions in the state surged from last year by double digits. The San Francisco Bay Area recorded the highest year-over-year price growth with an increase of 15.9 percent, followed by the Central Valley (14.9 percent), the Central Coast (13.4 percent) and Southern California (11.7 percent).

-- At the county level, home prices continued to rise across the state, with 26 counties in California setting new record median highs in April 2022.

-- California’s unsold inventory of homes improved slightly in April 2022 at 1.8 months, compared to 1.7 months in March 2022 and 1.6 months in April 2021. The number of active listings surged more than 20 percent on a year-over-year basis and recorded the highest yearly growth in properties for sale since January 2019. Active listings in April climbed to the highest level in seven months.

-- In San Diego, the inventory of available homes for sales in April 2022 was 1.6 months, compared to 1.4 months in March 2022, 1.5 months in February 2022 and January 2022 and 1.5 months in April 2021. Inventory levels from previous months in 2021 included: December, 1.0; November, 1.3; October, 1.5; September, 1.6; August, 1.7; July, 1.7. Inventory levels indicate the number of months it would take for the available supply of homes on the market to sell-out given the current rate of sales.

April 2022 County Unsold Inventory and Days on Market
(Regional and condo sales data not seasonally adjusted)

April 2022 County Unsold Inventory and Days on Market

-- The median number of days it took to sell an existing, single-family home in San Diego County in April 2022 was 7 days, compared to 7 days in March and February 2022, 9 days in January 2022 and 6 days in April 2021. Numbers from previous months in 2021 included: December, 8; November, 9; October, 9; September, 9; August, 8; July, 7; June, 6; May, 7; April, 6. The median represents a time when half the homes sell above it and half below it.

-- Statewide, the median number of days it took to sell a California single-family home in April 2022 was 8 days, compared to 8 days in March 2022, 9 days in February 2022, 12 days in January 2022 and 7 days in April 2021. Numbers from previous months in 2021 included: December, 12; November, 11; October, 11; September, 10.

-- The statewide median sales-price-to-list-price ratio remained above 100 percent at 104.2 percent in April 2022, compared to 103.3 percent in March 2022, 102.6 percent in February 2022 and 103.3 percent in April 2021. Sales-to-list-price ratio is an indicator that reflects the negotiation power of home buyers and sellers under current market conditions. The ratio, expressed as a percentage, is calculated by dividing the final sales price of a property by its last list price. A sales-to-list ratio with 100 percent or above suggests that the property sold for more than the list price, while a ratio below 100 percent indicates that the price sold below the asking price.

-- The 30-year, fixed-mortgage interest rate averaged 4.98 percent in April, up from 3.06 percent in April 2021, according to Freddie Mac. The five-year, adjustable mortgage interest rate averaged 3.70 percent, compared to 2.81 percent in April 2021.

Topics: Brokers/Managers, Market Information